Tag: Sanctuary

Breaking! Primarily Primates’ Issues Urgent Plea For Generators, Water & More After Animals At The Sanctuary Die During Historic Texas Freeze

Primarily Primates, a non-profit sanctuary in Bexar County, Texas, that provides lifetime care for hundreds of animals including 32 chimpanzees, is among millions without power in the state after an Arctic blast created blackouts due to frozen power lines, natural gas production freezing under pressure, pipes bursting and increased demand for power.

Sadly, the sanctuary has been without power since early Monday morning. While the staff and volunteers work tirelessly around the clock to evacuate dozens of animals from the 78-acre sanctuary and use heaters and generators to keep the remaining animals warm, they are also mourning the loss of approximately 12 animals, including monkeys and lemurs.

Tragically, 58-year-old Violet, Primarily Primates’ oldest chimp, also passed away, but it was determined that she did not die from hypothermia but most-likely a stroke. While Violet, who was formerly used in biomedical research, had pre-existing conditions, it is reasonable to conclude that the extreme cold may have contributed to her having the fatal stroke.

“Every animal matters to us and we are devastated,” Priscilla Feral, President of Friends of Animals, which has managed the sanctuary since 2007, said in a statement. “We know this unprecedented Arctic blast is taking a toll on humans, which is why we are so grateful to the San Antonio Zoo staff for helping us transport and care for animals, as well as the more than 60 volunteers who have organized meetups and driven their 4x4s in treacherous conditions to bring us supplies. Their kindness brings some comfort during this nightmare. They are heroes, and so are our staff members.”

Primarily Primates’ Executive Director Brooke Chavez reports that currently all of the chimpanzees and other primates that remain on the property are doing well and keeping warm with properly ventilated propane heaters. Staff members check on them every 20 minutes around the clock.

As previously reported by WAN, Primarily Primates agreed to take eight of the chimps from the now-closed Wildlife Waystation in California, providing that they have the financing needed to expand their facilities to accommodate them. Three of the chimps have already been transferred while the remaining five are still waiting to be moved.

Primarily Primates is still currently without power and in need of the following items, as well as monetary donations. If you have any of the requested supplies below and have a four-wheel drive vehicle, please deliver them to 26099 Dull Knife Trail in San Antonio.

– GENERATORS- this is the most important item on the list!

– Peanut butter, bread, jelly

– Camping lights

– Propane tanks that are filled or help taking empty tanks to be filled

– Small disposable propane heater bottles

– Salt for de-icing pathways around the sanctuary

– Water

Monetary donations can be made HERE!

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

The post Breaking! Primarily Primates’ Issues Urgent Plea For Generators, Water & More After Animals At The Sanctuary Die During Historic Texas Freeze appeared first on World Animal News.

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WAN Exclusive With Animal Place Sanctuary Which Urgently Needs To Find Homes For 6 Cows Being Saved From Slaughter In Northern California

Photos by: Marji Beach, Animal Place

What started as a heartwarming story about the rescue of two 20-year-old cows, Honey and Babe, by Animal Place, a nonprofit that provides a safe haven to nearly 400 rescued farm animals, and promotes a compassionate vegan lifestyle, has turned into an urgent call to action to help save six more cows before they are sent to auction to be slaughtered at the end of January.

WAN talked to Kim Sturla, the Executive Director of Animal Place, as well as the organization’s Director of Fund Development, Marji Beach, who secured the rescue of Honey and Babe, which took place on January 16th.

Honey

Sturla explained to WAN that there were a total of 13 cows, the majority believed to be offspring of either Honey or Babe, that needed new homes after their elderly caregiver could no longer tend to them and her family was unable to afford their upkeep.

Babe

While they were able to find a home for five of the cows at a sanctuary in San Diego, Sturla and Beach are now trying to save the remaining cows before they fall into the wrong hands or are sent to auction where they will most-likely end up being slaughtered for their meat.

“Cows are so hard to find placement for. They are large animals, expensive to care for, and require complex care,” Beach told WAN, noting that the best resolution to the situation would be to find an adopter or adopters for the remaining cows, ideally in Northern California. “Animal Place has a lot of land but, sadly, not enough staff to take care of six more animals. It is hard to find caregivers in rural areas.”

They encourage people who are interested in volunteering or working for the sanctuary to contact Animal Place HERE.

The priority now is to find the six remaining cows new homes. If you are interested in adopting them, please contact Marji Beach at marji@animalplace.org.

Donations to help Honey and Babe, as well as the six remaining cows who need to find their forever homes, can also be made HERE!

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

The post WAN Exclusive With Animal Place Sanctuary Which Urgently Needs To Find Homes For 6 Cows Being Saved From Slaughter In Northern California appeared first on World Animal News.

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FOUR PAWS Rescues Bears Suzie And Bubloo And Relocates Them To A Sanctuary In Jordan Marking The End Of Marghazar Zoo In Islamabad

Following the successful rescue of the now world-famous elephant Kaavan two weeks ago, global animal welfare organization FOUR PAWS International managed to evacuate the last two animals at Marghazar Zoo, Himalayan brown bears Suzie and Bubloo.

FOUR PAWS transferred the bears via plane yesterday from Pakistan to Jordan, where they will find a species-appropriate home at the sanctuary “Al Ma’wa for Nature and Wildlife” – run by the Princess Alia Foundation and FOUR PAWS.

The departure of Suzie and Bubloo, means that there are finally no more animals left in the Islamabad zoo, which is finally closing its gates for good.

Since August 2020, FOUR PAWS, together with Pakistan’s Ministry of Climate Change, the Islamabad Wildlife Management Board (IWMB), and financially supported by American businessman Eric S. Margolis, has evacuated over 30 animals from Marghazar Zoo, including: wolves, deer, rabbits, monkeys, and elephant Kaavan.

The two bears Suzie and Bubloo have endured years of suffering. Before they came to Marghazar Zoo, they were abused as so-called dancing bears. To prevent them from hurting their owner and spectators, both bears had almost all of their teeth removed.

The FOUR PAWS team also found serious behavioral issues with the animals. Vets had to perform an emergency surgery on 17-year-old Suzie back in August 2020, as she was suffering from a badly infected chest wound likely due to a recent tumour removal.

“After witnessing the departure of recently rescued elephant Kaavan, Suzie and Bubloo have also finally starting their new life. With their departure to Jordan, we can give the bears the medical treatment and care they desperately need,” said Dr. Amir Khalil, FOUR PAWS veterinarian and head of the rescue mission, in a statement. “After almost four months of hard work in Pakistan, we are locking the gates of Marghazar Zoo once and for all.

“The last-minute cancellation of the bears’ export permits was a brief setback last week but thankfully the Islamabad High Court and IWMB ruled once again in favor of animal welfare,” concluded Khalil. The transfer would also never have been possible without the support of the Pakistani community, as well as the financial help of American businessman Eric S. Margolis.”

We are happy Suzie and Bubloo will now begin to live their lives loved and cared for at Sanctuary Al Ma’wa for Nature and Wildlife.

Please donate to FOUR PAWS today to help them continue to save more animals around the world HERE!

The post FOUR PAWS Rescues Bears Suzie And Bubloo And Relocates Them To A Sanctuary In Jordan Marking The End Of Marghazar Zoo In Islamabad appeared first on World Animal News.

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Cher Helps Kaavan, The World’s Loneliest Elephant, Finally Relocate From The Marghazar Zoo In Pakistan To The Cambodia Wildlife Sanctuary

Photos By: FOUR PAWS International

Kaavan, the world’s loneliest elephant, has finally been relocated from the Marghazar Zoo in Islamabad, Pakistan, to the Cambodia Wildlife Sanctuary, with global animal welfare organization FOUR PAWS International overseeing the transfer.

Last month, the Islamabad High Court appointed Dr. Amir Khalil, veterinarian at  FOUR PAWS, as amicus curiae and assigned him with the logistical organization of Kaavan’s relocation, along with the support of the NGO Free The Wild.

As WAN reported in 2017, Free The Wild’s co-founder, music legend Cher, has been fighting for Kaavan’s rescue since 2016.

Cher waiting for Kaavan in Cambodia.

A Russian cargo plane and a four-ton transport crate that was able to hold a wild elephant are just some of the things that FOUR PAWS had to organize for Kavaan’s departure.

For FOUR PAWS, the rescue of Kaavan was their first elephant transfer by air. Worldwide, only a handful of adult elephants have been relocated by plane. To prepare 36-year-old Kaavan for his departure, the FOUR PAWS team, consisting of veterinarians and elephant experts, also spent about three months in Pakistan’s capital, Islamabad. Three times a day, the team practiced safe and stress-free entry and exit into and from the transport crate with Kaavan who weighs approximately four tons.

“Kaavan quickly gained confidence in us and made great progress in a short time. In his case, it not only took a village but a whole country to transfer Kaavan to Cambodia,” Dr. Khalil said in a statement. “Without the support of the Islamabad Wildlife Management Board, the Pakistani authorities and the local community, American businessman Eric S. Margolis, as well as our partners from Free The Wild, this relocation would not have been possible.”

“It fills me with incredible joy to see that Kaavan’s suffering is finally coming to an end. I cannot wait to bring him to Cambodia together with the FOUR PAWS team.” noted Cher prior to Kaavan’s long trip to his new home. “For the past four years my partners in Free The Wild – Mark, Gina, and I – have been working tirelessly to achieve this moment. ‘Free Kaavan’ will soon no longer be just a hashtag, but reality. And, that makes me extremely proud and happy.”

Kaavan at the Marghazar Zoo

The 28-hectare Marghazar Zoo was originally opened in 1978 as a wildlife sanctuary in the Margalla Hills in Islamabad, but was later sadly converted into a zoo. The zoo has been owned by Islamabad since its opening. Kaavan came to Pakistan as a gift from Sri Lanka in 1985. From 1990 on, he shared his enclosure at Marghazar Zoo with his partner, Saheli, but since her death in 2012, Kaavan has lived a lonely existence. The zoo repeatedly made headlines because of its poor conditions.

Kaavan at the Marghazar Zoo

WAN also reported in August, about the release of shocking video footage involving two lions that were caught in a fire in their small enclosure at the zoo. Both big cats tragically died because of smoke inhalation. In recent years, over 500 animals at the zoo have been reported missing, and in the last four years alone, over two dozen animals have died at the Marghazar Zoo.

Together with the Islamabad Wildlife Management Board (IWMB), FOUR PAWS has already safely relocated three wolves, several monkeys, and all the rabbits, that used to be kept in Marghazar Zoo, in Pakistan.

WAN is thankful that Marghazar Zoo will finally be closing its doors permanently and the animals there will no longer have to suffer.

Please help FOUR PAWS with Kaavan’s rescue by donating HERE! 

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

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‘Save A Life This Thanksgiving, Adopt A Turkey’ Billboard Campaign Launched By Peace 4 Animals & WAN In LA To Support Farm Sanctuary

Peace 4 Animals, World Animal News (WAN), and Farm Sanctuary are once again encouraging people to make the compassionate choice for the holidays by adopting a turkey rather than eating one for Thanksgiving dinner.

“We began the ‘Save A Life This Thanksgiving, Adopt A Turkey’ billboard campaign after realizing that something needed to be done to raise awareness about the estimated 46 million turkeys who are killed in the United States for Thanksgiving alone each year,” said Katie Cleary, Founder and President of Peace 4 Animals and World Animal News. “Taking action to save the lives of animals is the most important thing that we can do to create positive change for ourselves, our planet, and of course, for the animals. This campaign, in partnership with Farm Sanctuary, sends a clear message to choose compassion on your plate and change the way we’re conditioned to think about farm animals in this country; to actually make a connection to who we are eating.”

Farm Sanctuary Adoptable Turkeys Include Venus “The Champion”

The 2020 ‘Save A Life This Thanksgiving Adopt A Turkey’ billboard is strategically located on the highly-trafficked 710 Long Beach Freeway near the Imperial Highway exit in the city of Lynwood in Los Angeles County.

Farm Sanctuary Adoptable Turkeys Include Ferris “The Hotshot”

“If 2020 has taught us anything, it’s the importance of empathy and that our choices impact the lives of others,” Farm Sanctuary President and Co-Founder Gene Baur told WAN. “If we can celebrate a more joyous ‘turkey day’ without causing unnecessary killing and suffering, why wouldn’t we? By widening our circle of compassion to include one of the most abused creatures on the planet, we can prevent the enormous harm that factory farming causes people and other animals.”

Farm Sanctuary Adoptable Turkeys Include Tutu “The Charmer”

For only $35.00, anyone from anywhere around the world can sponsor a turkey that was saved by Farm Sanctuary. The rescued turkeys are given a new life at one of the organization’s sanctuaries located in Watkins Glen, New York, or Los Angeles, California.

Farm Sanctuary Adoptable Turkeys Include Sandy “The Sweetheart”

Venus “The Champion,” Ferris “The Hotshot,” Tutu “The Charmer,” Sandy “The Sweetheart,” and Jackie “The Queen” are among Farm Sanctuary’s adoptable turkeys this year. The fee to adopt the flock is only $150.00.

Farm Sanctuary Adoptable Turkeys Include Jackie “The Queen”

“Thanksgiving and turkeys have become synonymous, but sadly, not in a way that celebrates them. At Farm Sanctuary, we’re trying to change that,” noted Farm Sanctuary’s CEO, Megan Watkins. “By highlighting the unique personalities of these birds, while also exposing the abuse that they face in an unjust food system, we inspire people to start new compassionate traditions, like adopting a rescued turkey for Thanksgiving instead of eating one.”

Farm Sanctuary will send everyone who adopts a turkey an adoption certificate that reminds people that turkeys are living, feeling beings, who deserve to be treated with kindness and compassion.

The flock

“Spreading awareness about the benefits of a plant-based diet is among the many critical issues WAN and Peace 4 Animals strive to address on a daily basis, and we welcome the opportunity to support other like-minded organizations such as Farm Sanctuary to amplify this important message,” shared Cleary. “It is more important than ever to spread compassion this year. Adopting a turkey instead of eating one on Thanksgiving is a life-changing step in the right direction towards a more compassionate world.”

Please join Peace 4 Animals, WAN, and Farm Sanctuary in making this Thanksgiving a compassionate one for ALL by sponsoring a Turkey HERE!

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Thousands Call On The University Of Memphis To Stop Using A Live Tiger Mascot Named TOM III At Football Games And Retire Him To An Accredited Sanctuary

Photo from In Defense of Animals

For over 40 years, the University of Memphis has traveled with a live tiger as the team mascot to every football game. Over the years, the University has used three tigers, who have all been named TOM (Tigers of Memphis).

All three TOMs were “presented” as youngsters to the University at football games. TOM III now serves as a fixture on Tiger Lane and in the south endzone during all games. Sadly, tens of thousands of fans have had their pictures taken with tigers over the years. 

However, big cats don’t belong at loud, crowded football games with over 60,000 cheering fans. 

In Defense of Animals supporters have written over 9,000 emails urging the University of Memphis to stop exploiting tigers as live mascots over ethical, conservation, and safety concerns. 

“Forcing wild animals who are very sensitive to their surroundings into crowds of screaming people is stressful and cruel. Taking pictures with a tiger also sends a harmful message and teaches fans that wild animals belong in cages, rather than in their natural habitats, and that they exist for our entertainment,” said Lisa Levinson, Wild Animals Campaigner for In Defense of Animals in an email sent to WAN. “It’s time to leave TOM III at home, instead of carting him around to attend games.”

Legal and ethical concerns surround the use of live animal mascots. Wild animal selfies are widely condemned by conservation and animal protection organizations. University news outlets also acknowledged the welfare concerns of the continued use of live animal mascots. 

TOM III’s used as a live mascot is especially troubling given that tigers are an endangered species in need of increased protection in the wild. Exploiting captive tigers undermines those efforts. Keeping these apex predators in conditions where their needs are not met, and putting the public in danger, has prompted Congress to consider the Big Cat Public Safety Act, which would ban their private possession in the United States.

The presence of a live tiger does not intimidate rival teams, but it does put them in real danger should the tiger escape. When the Louisiana State University (LSU) tiger mascot Mike IV escaped, he was shot with a tranquilizer gun three times before being recaptured. LSU has wisely made the decision since to stop carting its tiger mascot to games. They should also release him to an accredited sanctuary.

In addition to being extremely stressful and cruel to the tigers who are deprived of space to roam free, and everything that wild animals need to thrive, it is very expensive to care for tigers. The first TOM lived in a garage before being housed at the local zoo where he was a “popular attraction” for nearly 20 years. After living in a private home for a few months, the second TOM moved to the $300,000 Tiger House at St. Nick’s Farm and Zoological Park, where he died of cancer at 17 years old. TOM III’s enclosure cost $700,000 to build. 

“Why cause undue stress and suffering to TOM III when The University of Memphis has a perfectly capable human mascot named Pouncer?” shared Marilyn Kroplick M.D., President of In Defense of Animals. “President Rudd, this is your golden opportunity to launch an educational and ecologically sound campaign to keep wild animals in the wild.

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

The post Thousands Call On The University Of Memphis To Stop Using A Live Tiger Mascot Named TOM III At Football Games And Retire Him To An Accredited Sanctuary appeared first on World Animal News.

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WAN Exclusive: W.O.L.F. Sanctuary Evacuates 30 Wolves & Wolf Hybrids From The Catastrophic Wildfires In Colorado

Photos from the W.O.L.F. Sanctuary and The Wild Animal Sanctuary

As wildfires continue to burn in Colorado, 30 wolves and wolf dog hybrids are now safe after being evacuated from the W.O.L.F. Sanctuary, and temporarily relocated to safety at The Wild Animal Sanctuary (TWAS).

WAN talked exclusively with Jessica Kole, W.O.L.F. Sanctuary’s Director of Development, about the unique challenges that came with transferring these predominately elusive animals from one location to another, as well as the current status of the animals affected by the Colorado wildfires.

“It takes a lot of patience and work,” Kole told WAN, explaining that while the W.O.L.F. Sanctuary has a few animals that serve as social ambassadors, most wolves and wolf dogs prefer little to no human interaction. “Each wolf has a different personality. It was critical that we moved from one habitat to the next while putting the least amount of stress on the animals, creating as calm an atmosphere as possible.”

Kole also emphasized the importance of teamwork, expressing gratitude for the collaboration between the W.O.L.F. Sanctuary and The Wild Animal Sanctuary.

While Kole shared that volunteers and staff were able to collect the wolf social ambassadors and drive them away from the devastating wildfires, it was The Wild Animal Sanctuary’s Founder and Executive Director, Patrick Craig, and his team who arrived with the vehicles and equipment necessary to transfer the majority of the wolves to safety at their Keenesburg, Colorado, facility two-hours away.

There, the wolves and wolf dog hybrids remain in pairs with their mates, securely separated from other animals.

The length of time that the animals will stay at The Wild Animal Sanctuary is dependent on the weather and containment of the wildfires. While the Lewstone Fire has been contained, the Cameron Peak Fire continues to burn and threaten the W.O.L.F. Sanctuary.

“Our location could be at risk if the Cameron Peak Fire creeps closer,” said Kole. “We will not bring the animals back until we feel comfortable that the wildfire is contained. No concrete decision has been made.”

Most of the animals at the W.O.L.F. Sanctuary have been rescued from a harrowing life of mistreatment and fear. Many have been saved from dog breeders who try to exploit the animals as exotic pets. Once they start to display wolf traits, they can no longer take care of them. Other wolves have been rescued from equally deplorable and greedy industries, including those that were saved from fur farms.

“We are a nonprofit that relies on donations as we get no government funding,” Kole shared, further explaining that the organization also has little opportunities for grants as their captive-born wolves and wolf dog rescues cannot be released into the wild or adopted as pets. “They are different from domestic dogs.”

While the W.O.L.F. Sanctuary had a proactive evacuation plan in place, donations are needed now more than ever to purchase new trailers and crates, as well as an SUV to be more equipped for future emergencies.

Donations to the W.O.L.F. Sanctuary can be made HERE! 

Ways to help and donate to The Wild Animal Sanctuary can be made HERE!

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

The post WAN Exclusive: W.O.L.F. Sanctuary Evacuates 30 Wolves & Wolf Hybrids From The Catastrophic Wildfires In Colorado appeared first on World Animal News.

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Captive Beluga Whales Named Little White & Little Grey Have Been Rescued From A Russian Research Center & Released To An Open Water Sanctuary In Iceland

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Nonhuman Rights Project Urges For An Elephant Named Minnie To Be Released To A Sanctuary After Claims That The Commerford Zoo Can No Longer Afford To Take Care Of Her

Earlier this week, the Nonhuman Rights Project (NhRP) sent letters to local, state, and federal agencies urging them to immediately investigate after a Goshen-based traveling circus publicly acknowledged that its unable to provide basic care for Minnie, the elephant in its custody, as a result of the COVID-19 lockdowns.

“We were extremely worried about Minnie well before the COVID-19 crisis and are even more so now,” Courtney Fern, the NhRP’s Director of Government Relations and Campaigns, said in a statement.

For over two years, the NhRP has been fighting in court and alongside local activists to free Minnie, a 48-year-old wild-born Asian elephant, to one of the two accredited elephant sanctuaries in the United States; both of which have offered her lifelong care at no cost to the Commerford Zoo. Recently, the NhRP learned of an online fundraiser set up by the family that sold Minnie (whom they call Mignon) to the Commerford Zoo in 1976.

With the authorization of the Commerford Zoo, the GoFundMe page seeks to raise $2.4 million to enable them to meet Minnie’s most basic needs, including food and veterinary care due to COVID-19, which has “impoverished the farm that supports them,” and is “in desperate need of support,” according to the description of the fundraiser. Created over a month ago, the fundraiser has only raised $1,405 so far.

“We understand the Commerford Zoo is in dire straights,” continued Fern. “For their sake and the sake of the many animals at their facility, they need to let Minnie go to a sanctuary. It is abhorrent for them not to do so immediately.”

The NhRP submitted a complaint online to the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and via email to the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP), and the Torrington Police Department’s Animal Control Division, all of which have a responsibility to investigate animal welfare concerns pertaining to the Commerford Zoo.

The NhRP has repeatedly offered to drop its litigation against the Commerford Zoo—originally brought on behalf of Minnie and two elephants, Beulah and Karen, who have since died—if they agreed to release Minnie to The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee (TES) or the Performing Animal Welfare Society sanctuary (PAWS). Both facilities are vastly larger than the Commerford Zoo’s property and specially designed to meet elephants’ complex needs. The Commerford Zoo has ignored these offers.

The NhRP finds this fundraiser especially disappointing and egregious because the organizers and the Commerford Zoo are aware that Minnie has a place waiting for her in a sanctuary, and it would not cost them anything to do the right thing and release her.

Minnie is controlled by a bullhook, confined most of the time to a dark, barren barn, and lacks the company of other elephants.

Beulah and Karen both died in 2019, leaving Minnie the sole surviving elephant in the custody of the Commerford Zoo. As confirmed by the USDA in response to an inquiry from U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) after Beulah collapsed in public at the Big E fair, Beulah died as a result of blood poisoning caused by a uterine infection that the Commerford Zoo was aware that she had when they transported her to the venue, and sadly Karen died of kidney disease.

Founded in Goshen, Connecticut, by Robert “Bob” W. Commerford, the Commerford Zoo (also known as R.W. Commerford & Sons (and or) the Kids Fun Fair & Zoo) owns Minnie the elephant, as well as: camels, sheep, goats, llamas, donkeys, pygmy horses, ringtail lemurs, macaws, a kangaroo, and a zebra, among other animals. The USDA has cited the Commerford Zoo more than 50 times for failing to adhere to the minimum standards required by the Animal Welfare Act.

The NhRP is considering its next steps in its elephant rights litigation on Minnie’s behalf after the Connecticut Supreme Court declined to hear her case. The grassroots campaign to free Minnie to an accredited sanctuary has gained the support of Senator Blumenthal, Connecticut State Representative David Michel, Representative Anne Hughes, and other lawmakers. The NhRP will continue to fight for as long as it takes for Minnie’s release to a sanctuary where her right to liberty will be respected.

The post Nonhuman Rights Project Urges For An Elephant Named Minnie To Be Released To A Sanctuary After Claims That The Commerford Zoo Can No Longer Afford To Take Care Of Her appeared first on World Animal News.

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