Tag: Pets

Breaking! 30 Slow Lorises Reportedly Kept As ‘Pets’ Are Rescued & Released Back Into The Rainforest In Indonesia

A team of conservationists has reintroduced 30 Javan slow lorises back into their rainforest home in Indonesia. Mount Halimun Salak National Park (TNGHS) carried out the release operation, along with the Center for Natural Resources Conservation (BKSDA) and International Animal Rescue (IAR) Indonesia. 

As per Ammy Nurwati, the head of BKSDA, most of the lorises had been surrendered by members of the community to various sections of BKSDA in West Java, and had been entrusted to the IAR Indonesia Primate Center in Bogor to undergo treatment and care. Before being released back into the wild, the lorises had undergone a recovery and treatment process to stimulate their natural behavior. Starting with medical examinations and time in quarantine, they also underwent behavioral observations until they were declared healthy and ready to be translocated for habituation and then final release.

“During the habituation process, the team in the field continues to observe and record their progress every night. If, during the habituation period, all lorises are active and don’t have any abnormal behaviors, then they can be released into the wild,” Ammy shared in a statement sent to WAN. “They have to go through this long process to restore their natural instincts and ensure that they can survive and reproduce in their natural habitat.”

Ammy further explained that the slow loris release program was created to support the sustainability of ecological processes in the conservation area, as well as to maintain and increase the population of primate species whose numbers are decreasing.

Ahmad Munawir, Head of the TNGHS Office, said that the release of rehabilitated animals and conflict animals in Mount Halimun Salak National Park has become one of the most important programs in terms of saving wildlife. The slow loris is one of the wild animals that is vital to maintaining the balance of the ecosystem in the National Park. The release area has an ecosystem considered suitable as a place for the preservation and protection of slow lorises in terms of area security, availability of food and shade, habitat carrying capacity, and the level of predator threats. The hope is that with this release, the slow lorises can reproduce and thrive.

In order to minimize all risk of disease transmission, the safety procedures at IAR’s primate center in Bogor have been strengthened even further due to the COVID-19 pandemic situation.

“The health and safety protocols in this release activity were improved to minimize the risk of disease transmission. From the animal-side, a swab-test was carried out in the laboratory facility of the Center for Study of Primates – IPB University, and the results were all negative. From the human side, the implementation of all protocols was carried out correctly,” stated Alan Knight OBE, IAR Chief Executive. “All adjustments in this release procedure are part of efforts to eliminate the potential for transmission of COVID-19 and other zoonotic infectious diseases, so that our release and other conservation activities can continue, even in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

The post Breaking! 30 Slow Lorises Reportedly Kept As ‘Pets’ Are Rescued & Released Back Into The Rainforest In Indonesia appeared first on World Animal News.

Source link

Five Orangutans Formerly Kept As “Pets” In West Borneo Are Rehabilitated & Released Back Into Their Rainforest Home

Five orangutans were released back into the wild in West Borneo after they were all rescued from captivity. Sadly, their mothers had been killed so that the babies could be captured and sold on the black market as “pets.”

Prior to their release, the orphaned orangutans had spent years undergoing rehabilitation at an orangutan center in Ketapang, West Borneo.

The release was carried out by the Natural Resources Conservation Agency for West Kailmantan (BKSDA), the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park (TNBBBR) and a team from International Animal Rescue (IAR) Indonesia.

The five orangutans consisted of three males named Jacky, Beno, and Puyol, and two females named Oscarina and Isin.

Isin was the most recent orangutan to be rescued from Kayong Utara district in 2017, while Puyol had spent the longest time in the IAR rehabilitation center, having been rescued in the Kendawangan area in 2010. Jacky was rescued from the Muara Pawan area in August 2013, Beno from the Simpang Dua area in 2015, and Oscarina was rescued from Pontianak in 2011.

The rehabilitation process is not always straightforward and can take some considerable time, depending on the circumstances and needs of the orangutan. Rehabilitation is necessary to develop the orangutans’ ability to survive in their natural habitat.

In the wild, baby orangutans will stay with their mothers until the age of 7-8 years old to learn from their mothers. Because these baby orangutans were forcibly separated from their mothers in order to be sold as “pets,” they were deprived of the opportunity to master the necessary survival skills.

The head of the TNBBBR Center, Agung Nugroho, stated that this release was carried out through a series of activities and studies. He hopes that the orangutans will be able to form new populations and maintain the existence of their species. Last February, his party also released five other orangutans.

“All these activities and studies are carried out to ensure that all orangutans who have been released can live safely and have adequate food. When a release has been carried out, it doesn’t mean our work is done. The monitoring team will continue its work to ensure that each released orangutan can adapt to its new habitat,” said Nugroho in a statement.

It can take up to three days to reach the point of release from IAR Indonesia’s orangutan rehabilitation center. However, the status of the area as a National Park will ensure the safety of critical species.

“With the release of these five orangutans, 51 orangutans have been released in the working area of the TNBBBR Center, consisting of ten wild orangutans that have been translocated and 41 rehabilitated orangutans from the Ketapang Orangutan Conservation Centre,” said Nugroho.

“It’s time for each to learn to live side by side in harmony. Humans as creatures that are considered the smartest, have the greatest responsibility to create and maintain the harmony of nature,” said the Head of the West Kalimantan BKSDA, Sadtata Noor Adirahmanta.

This wild release program has proved so successful that three baby orangutans have been born naturally in the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park area to the rehabilitated orangutans released there. The birth of a new generation of orangutans has fuelled hopes that the orangutan population in the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park and in West Kalimantan will be maintained and sustainable.

Alan Knight OBE, Chief Executive of International Animal Rescue said, “It’s always a joyful occasion when orangutans are released back into their natural habitat. It gives us all hope for the future of their species, as well as for the future of the forest as a whole and for every living creature that depends on it for survival.”

The post Five Orangutans Formerly Kept As “Pets” In West Borneo Are Rehabilitated & Released Back Into Their Rainforest Home appeared first on World Animal News.

Source link

SPCA’s Operation Military Pets Marks Its 2,000th Grant Helping U.S. Soldiers Transport Their Pets When They Are Transferred To Duty

The recipient of the 2,000th grant is the Wood family, who applied for an OMP program grant to help move Thor and Loki from Hawaii to Chantilly, Virginia.

SPCA International has awarded its 2,000th grant through its Operation Military Pets (OMP) program, which helps U.S. soldiers transport their pets when they are moved or transferred to duty in the United States and abroad.

The military does not pay for pet relocation when soldiers receive Permanent Change of Station (PCS) orders, and families are burdened with the high cost of moving them. Moving pets overseas is also often extremely expensive, sometimes costing thousands of dollars per animal.

The recipient of the 2,000th grant is the Wood family, who applied for an OMP program grant to help move their two yellow Labradors, Thor and Loki, from Hawaii to Chantilly, Virginia. With higher flight costs due to the COVID-19 pandemic and heat embargoes, the family needed help with the cost of transporting their beloved pets to their new home.

“They are our children’s companions, tagging along with them from room to room, sleeping with them at night. They are such loving boys, and we would be devastated to ever separate from them,” shared Mrs. Wood, who further explained that she would never allow that to happen.

Sadly, shelters near military bases report high surrender rates caused by military families not being able to afford to relocate their dogs or cats. SPCA International is glad to provide this crucial aid to keep families and pets together.

“We are so grateful to be able to help keep so many families together with their beloved pets,” Meredith Ayan, Executive Director of SPCA International, said in a statement sent to WAN. “Companion animals bring so much joy and stability to members of the military and their families, and these families provide wonderful care and safe homes for thousands of pets.”

SPCA International is proud to have eased this financial burden for over 1,000 American military families since the launch of OMP in March 2013. Families are eligible for OMP financial aid once every three years.

More information about Operation Military Pets and ways to donate to this important and compassionate SPCA International initiative can be found, HERE!

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

The post SPCA’s Operation Military Pets Marks Its 2,000th Grant Helping U.S. Soldiers Transport Their Pets When They Are Transferred To Duty appeared first on World Animal News.

Source link

Powerful New Video Reveals The Tragic Plight Of Slow Lorises Being Kept As Pets; Support International Animal Rescue’s Campaign Against This Deplorable Trade!

Five years from its initial ‘Tickling is Torture’ video exposing the plight of slow lorises being kept illegally as pets, International Animal Rescue (IAR) has produced a sequel, narrated by actor and animal advocate Peter Egan.

The heart-wrenching video was produced in response to the growing number of videos emerging on social media platforms TikTok and Instagram showing slow lorises being kept in people’s homes as though they are domestic pets.

Graphic footage illustrates that, before the lorises are sold, the traders cut out their teeth to make them easier to handle. Many of the primates die from blood loss or infection as a result of this barbaric practice.

“Hundreds of thousands of people have already signed the pledge never to support or encourage the illegal trade in slow lorises. Yet, still there are those who think it is acceptable to keep a wild slow loris cooped up in a cage in a domestic environment, feed it unsuitable food that will leave it malnourished and may even kill it. Then they parade the poor loris on social media, portraying it as cute and funny, when really its situation is desperately sad,” Alan Knight OBE, IAR Chief Executive said in a statement sent to WAN.

“The Javan slow loris is among the world’s 25 most endangered primates,” continued Knight. “In an ideal world, social media platforms like TikTok would remove such blatant examples of animal exploitation.”

Sign the pledge not to support the illegal pet trade of slow lorises HERE!

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

The post Powerful New Video Reveals The Tragic Plight Of Slow Lorises Being Kept As Pets; Support International Animal Rescue’s Campaign Against This Deplorable Trade! appeared first on World Animal News.

Source link

WAN Exclusive Update With Beirut For The Ethical Treatment of Animals (BETA) About Pets Affected By The Devastating Explosion In Lebanon

Photos from Beirut for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (BETA)

Following the massive explosion that devastated the Capitol of Lebanon earlier this month, Beirut for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (BETA), the first no-kill shelter in the country, remains on the ground caring for animals impacted by the catastrophic event. SPCA International has committed to a $20,000 grant to support BETA’s work in the aftermath of the crisis.

WAN talked with BETA representatives today to get an update about the dire situation. Tragically, the number of injured animals found in the aftermath of the explosion continues to grow.

As per data from Dr. Ihab Chaaban, Head of the Lebanese Syndicate of Veterinarians, one week after the explosions, it was estimated that 123 injured dogs and cats have been found and are currently being treated for their injuries. Many experienced trauma from the blast being hit by shattered glass. Others tragically passed away near ground zero. This does not include animals who were taken outside of the city for veterinary care.

Currently, BETA’s dog and cat shelters are at full capacity. They are now caring for more than 1,000 animals, including: 850 dogs, 200 cats, three horses, one donkey, and one monkey.

As noted in an earlier statement sent to WAN, BETA is also continuing to care for approximately 80 dogs that remain in the region of the port; providing them with food and water, as well as treatments to remove and protect the animals from fleas and worms. They are also starting a campaign to spay and neuter homeless and displaced neighborhood dogs.

“SPCA International is sending an emergency disaster relief grant of $20,000 to BETA Lebanon. The staff and volunteers at BETA are looking after the animals left at the port, as well as those who have lost their homes in the wake of the August 4th disaster,” Meredith Ayan, SPCAI’s Executive Director told WAN. “We are proud to support their vital work as Beirut recovers from the devastating explosion at the port.”

Many people have and continue to request help from BETA to treat their pets, as well as to help those who cannot afford to feed their animals. BETA is expecting the requests to drastically increase as the shock is over.

Please help Beirut for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (BETA) save and treat more animals affected by the explosion in Lebanon by donating HERE!

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

The post WAN Exclusive Update With Beirut For The Ethical Treatment of Animals (BETA) About Pets Affected By The Devastating Explosion In Lebanon appeared first on World Animal News.

Source link