Tag: Loss

Orangutan Named ‘Boncel’ Is Rescued & Translocated For A Second Time Due To Loss Of Habitat In Indonesia

An adult male orangutan, that was given the name Boncel, was recently rescued for a second time in West Kalimantan Province (Indonesian, Borneo).

The Wildlife Rescue Unit (WRU) of the Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA Kalbar) and International Animal Rescue (IAR) teamed up to help capture Boncel after he wandered into a village. He was then taken by the rescue team to a more remote part of the forest to ensure that he doesn’t return to the village.

The threat to the survival of orangutan species has increased due to the widespread fires that destroyed vast swathes of their rainforest habitat in the Ketapang area in 2019.

The devastation and deforestation of the land led to many orangutans being left without food and shelter. Orangutans were driven out of their natural habitat after the forest was destroyed and strayed into local villages in search of food, bringing them into contact with local people which resulted in conflict that risked harming both the orangutans and the villagers.

The Head of BKSDA Kalbar, Sadtata Noor Adirahmanta, expressed his appreciation for the quick response to this situation. “The repeated translocation of this orangutan shows that efforts to preserve wild endangered species require the cooperation of all parties. The community can support these efforts by themselves by working to repair wildlife habitats and prevent further damage to them.”

Boncel had been translocated from land belonging to residents in the village of Sungai Besar, to the surrounding forest, in mid-August of last year. The translocation was done in order to mitigate conflict with local villagers and take the orangutan back safely to the forest.

Although these translocations save the lives of individual orangutans, these actions are only a temporary solution.

This was proved in early November 2020, when IAR’s Orangutan Protection Unit (OPU) patrol team received information regarding Boncel entering Sungai Pelang Village.

The team immediately set off to verify the report and on November 11, 2020, they discovered one individual male orangutan eating the villagers’ pineapple plants. After observation and identification, they were able to confirm that this was in fact Boncel, who had previously been rescued from the village of Sungai Besar, and translocated by a team from the WRU of BKSDA Kalbar and IAR Indonesia on August 18th.

Consequently, the BKSDA’s WRU team and IAR Indonesia translocated Boncel for a second time. The operation, which took more than seven hours, went smoothly. IAR’s veterinarian examined Boncel’s condition and stated that the orangutan, who is estimated to be around 30-40 years old, is in good health and was fit to be translocated immediately.

You can help to save the last orangutans in Indonesia by looking on the back of products and packaged foods at the grocery store and commit to not purchasing anything containing Palm Oil or non-recycled paper products. #PalmsOffPalmOil 

The post Orangutan Named ‘Boncel’ Is Rescued & Translocated For A Second Time Due To Loss Of Habitat In Indonesia appeared first on World Animal News.

Source link

Breaking! Mass Stranding In New Zealand Results In The Tragic Loss Of 97 Pilot Whales & 3 Dolphins

Photo by: Biodiversity Ranger Jemma Welch, New Zealand Department of Conservation

The New Zealand Department of Conservation (DOC) reported the tragic news last week that 97 pilot whales and three dolphins died in a mass stranding on a remote Chatham Island beach.

After DOC Biodiversity Ranger Jemma Welch was notified about the stranding at 12:00pm last Sunday, she explained that due to the remote location and a power outage making it difficult to contact people, it was 3:00pm by the time rangers arrived at the scene at Waitangi West Beach.

“Only 26 of the whales were still alive at this point, the majority of them appeared very weak, and were sadly euthanized due to the rough conditions of the sea, and almost certainty because of great white sharks in the water which are brought in by a stranding like this,” Welch said in a statement.

Sadly, two more whales had stranded by Monday morning and had to be euthanized when a team of DOC staff made a follow-up visit to the site.

Hokotehi Moriori Trust and Ngāti Mutunga o Wharekauri Iwi Trust were notified and representatives joined DOC staff on Sunday where they performed a Karakia ceremony to honor the spirit of the whales.

“Bad weather and rough seas, with dirty water, reduced visibility, and sonar effectiveness, could confuse whales and dolphins,” the DOC explains on its website. “Mistakes while chasing prey in shallow waters are thought to be a major cause of strandings for orcas and dolphins. Conversely, large predators such as orcas might cause other marine mammals to panic and strand.”

The largest recorded mass stranding in New Zealand was in 1918 when an estimated 651,000 pilot whales stranded on the Chatham Islands.

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

The post Breaking! Mass Stranding In New Zealand Results In The Tragic Loss Of 97 Pilot Whales & 3 Dolphins appeared first on World Animal News.

Source link

African Wildlife Foundation Launches Virtual Safaris This Month To Help With The Loss That Tourism In Africa Is Suffering Due To The Pandemic

The African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) has been closely monitoring the difficult situation for safari operators in Africa since the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic  when travel bans and government closures began impacting protected areas and local communities on the front lines of wildlife conservation.

In April, AWF convened a meeting of 12 CEOs of leading safari companies operating in Africa to update the impact that COVID-19 was having on their core business operations as well as the threats to wildlife conservation areas. The goal was to determine the best ways for organizations, like AWF, to assist the tourism industry in order to help keep wildlife protected and communities afloat that rely on tourism.

An overarching concern during the pandemic is that people in wildlife communities, who typically gain from tourism dollars, will loosen their commitment to conservation behaviors as they seek alternatives to provide for their families, and that three decades of conservation progress may now be threatened.

“During our process of identifying how to assist our partners in the safari industry, we recognized the opportunity to share the information with donors through virtual safaris,” said AWF Safari Program Manager Carter Smith in a statement. “Many tourists have been introduced to the concept of virtual safaris, to experience wild animals and wildlands from the comfort of an arm chair. Our blue print was to reverse-engineer events to help both the safari-goers, who are grounded from international travel, and the communities in Africa on the front lines of wildlife conservation.”

The virtual safaris need to give participants an insider’s view into the wildlife conservation work on the ground, and introduce them to the heroes who are working tirelessly to defend Africa’s wildlife and wildlands. By pivoting to virtual safaris, wildlife tourists have a chance to hear stories of perseverance, develop meaningful connections, and learn how they can support the communities and field programs protecting wildlife directly.

AWF is engaging its donors though virtual safari offerings and offer them tangible takeaways as to how their donations support livelihoods and wildlife. The virtual safari-goers can go on a wildlife drive and chat with their guide or meet a ranger on a patrol with one of their sniffer dogs. They liken it to a fireside chat. These are not webinars. They are an enriching cultural experience, which is also informative and entertaining.

“We are designing virtual safari series around our 2021 safari portfolio to showcase our group safaris that will launch in October. Our guests will be transported to safaris in Uganda, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe. There will be local guides on each safari as well as our Country Directors to speak about the programmatic and emergency response work we are doing in each country,” concluded Smith.

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

The post African Wildlife Foundation Launches Virtual Safaris This Month To Help With The Loss That Tourism In Africa Is Suffering Due To The Pandemic appeared first on World Animal News.

Source link