Tag: Introduced

The Jane Goodall Act Was Recently Introduced In Canada & Would Become One Of The Strongest Animal Welfare Bills If Passed!

Canadian Senator Murray Sinclair has partnered with Dr. Jane Goodall to introduce the Jane Goodall Act, which, if passed, will become one of the strongest animal laws in history. This bill could send shockwaves that transform the legal standing of animals, not only in Canada, but across the world.

We need to urge the Canadian Senate to pass this landmark bill to give elephants, dolphins, great apes, and other animals the right to live free from hunting, captivity, and abuse.

The Jane Goodall Act, S218, would ban new captivity of great apes and elephants, and the use of them, including cetaceans, in performances. It would also strengthen an existing but flawed ban on the importation of elephant ivory and other hunting trophies, and would grant legal standing to great apes, elephants, whales, and dolphins. Granting animals legal standing would be a watershed event that would transform the landscape of animal protection in Canada.

Great apes, elephants, and cetaceans are all intelligent animals capable of suffering, they also have rich emotional and social lives. Yet sadly, in the case of animals in zoos, they are forced to live their lives imprisoned behind bars, then shipped away or killed when they are no longer needed. In the case of the trade in exotic species, animals are kidnapped from their homes, separated from their families, and condemned to a life behind bars, or are killed outright for their horns or fur.

More broadly, this bill would formalize a new language in the discourse of animal protection, one that acknowledges their sentience, and their emotional and social intelligence. It would be founded on the principle that animals deserve to be treated as individuals with legal standing and rights.

Unfortunately, it will grandfather in animals who are currently in captivity, and it allows for exceptions to the ban on captivity for the sake of “conservation, welfare, or non-harmful scientific research.” All of this is lamentable and must be remedied with time.

The bill has been structured to allow the government to extend provisions to other species kept in captivity, such as big cats, through the Noah Clause. Additionally, to stress a crucial point, the bill would point the way towards a transformation in how Canadian society treats and regards animals.

Not only does this bill have to make it through the Senate, it will also have to make it through the House of Commons, facing opposition from animal exploitation industries including zoos, hunting, and safari organizations.

While Senator Sinclair retired on January 31, he is projecting confidence that there is “very broad” support for the bill across the Canadian Senate. Should the bill ultimately pass the Senate, Liberal MP Nathaniel Erskine-Smith has said he will sponsor the bill in the House.

Should it pass, the Jane Goodall Act will join the ranks of the most important pieces of animal protection legislation in world history.

You can help by urging the Canadian Senate to pass this landmark bill to protect animals!

1. If you live in Canada, please call the Canadian Senate to urge swift passage of the Jane Goodall Act at 1-800-267-7362

Additionally, you may wish to also call George Furey, Speaker of the Senate of Canada, to urge him to expedite the passage of the Jane Goodall Act at 613-992-4416

2. Please sign In Defense of Animals’ letter to all the members of the Canadian Senate to urge passage of this bill by signing HERE!

Content courtesy of In Defense of Animals. Help them continue fighting for animals, people, and the environment by making a donation HERE!

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The Ocean-Based Climate Solutions Act Was Introduced To Tackle The Climate Crisis & Protect Marine Life In The U.S.

House Natural Resources Committee Chair Raúl M. Grijalva (D-Ariz.) unveiled the Ocean-Based Climate Solutions Act, along with House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis Chair Kathy Castor (D-Fla.), and original cosponsors, and supporters. This landmark legislation was introduced by more than a dozen members of the House of Representatives to address the ocean impacts of climate change and reform federal ocean management to better account for climate mitigation.

“A healthy ocean is key to fighting the climate crisis,” Grijalva said in a statement. “This bill provides a roadmap for ocean and coastal climate resilience, and uses them to curb the pollution that is intensifying the climate crisis. We must stop the ongoing damage to our oceans to protect the food, jobs, and coastlines that millions of Americans depend on.”

“The ocean is a powerful ally in the climate fight, and unleashing its potential will help us reach our goal of net-zero emissions by 2050 or earlier,” noted Castor. “The Ocean-Based Climate Solutions Act incorporates many of the recommendations in our Climate Crisis Action Plan, which gives Congress a roadmap for creating a healthier, more resilient, and more just America. It will unleash the incredible power of the ocean and address the threat that offshore drilling poses to America’s coastal communities, including my own community in Tampa Bay.”

The Ocean-Based Climate Solutions Act:

Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The bill supports the transition to a clean energy economy by reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with ocean sectors and increasing ocean-based renewable energy; helping to move away from fossil fuels and protect the ocean and coastal habitats that are important to healthy fish, marine wildlife, and coastal economies.

Increases Carbon Storage in Blue Carbon Ecosystems. The bill recognizes the carbon storage potential and other co-benefits provided by “blue carbon” ecosystems like salt marshes, sea grasses, and mangroves. These ecosystems absorb carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and safely store it at a rate of up to four times that of forests on land. They also protect coastal communities by limiting the impacts of coastal erosion, flooding, and storms; all while providing habitat for marine wildlife.

Promotes Coastal Resiliency and Adaptation. This is necessary to protect the coasts and communities from the climate impacts that cannot be avoided. It authorizes investment in coastal restoration and resilience that is a win-win for the economy, frontline communities, and the environment. 

Improves Ocean Protection. This is done by promoting and protecting healthy ocean systems and wildlife populations, which are better able to adapt to the effects of climate change. Marine protected areas, like protected areas on land, are a key part of protecting biodiversity while tackling climate change, which is more critical than ever due to the current biodiversity crisis.

Restores U.S. Leadership in International Ocean Governance. The bill aims to strengthen U.S. leadership in international ocean governance at a time when transboundary pressures on the ocean demand a coordinated response. These actions would both strengthen U.S. security and promote a resilient global ocean for the 21st century.

The newly introduced legislation enjoys enthusiastic support from environmental groups and ocean experts.

Our ocean is often portrayed as a victim of climate change, but the reality is that it offers a wealth of powerful solutions to fight the climate crisis, from spurring offshore renewable energy and banning new offshore drilling, to protecting blue carbon ecosystems, and creating new marine protected areas in order to conserve 30% of the ocean by 2030,” stated Alex Taurel, Conservation Program Director for the League of Conservation Voters.

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

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A Newly Introduced Bill In The United States Requires Companion Animal Survivors Of Laboratory Experiments To Be Adopted Into New Homes

California Congressman Tony Cárdenas recently introduced H.R. 8001, the Companion Animal Release from Experiments (CARE) Act. The CARE Act requires research facilities that use dogs, cats, and rabbits for research purposes and receive funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop and implement adoption policies for such animals when no longer used for research.

“It’s simple: if a research facility uses pets for research, then they must work to find them homes,” Congressman Cárdenas said in a statement. “We experiment on over 200,000 dogs, cats, and rabbits each year. The least we can do is give these living beings a chance at life in a loving home. My bill requires research facilities funded by the NIH to develop adoption policies for those animals. This is part of a larger effort to move away from animal-based testing and research wherever possible and toward more humane and sound scientific research.”

The CARE Act also requires facilities to maintain records of the animals used for research and to make those numbers and their adoptions available on their websites.

“The Companion Animal Release from Experiments Act builds on what eleven states have already done by requiring post-research adoption policies for dogs, cats, and rabbits used in tax-payer funded extramural research across the entire United States,” stated Monica Engebretson, North America Head of Public Affairs for Cruelty-Free International. The bill also provides for a high-level of public accountability and transparency about the adoption programs and their success. Shelters and rescue organizations across the United States place thousands of dogs, cats, and rabbits into loving homes each year and many are eager to do the same for laboratory survivors. We thank Representative Cardenas for introducing this important bill and for his humane leadership.”

California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, Nevada, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Washington have enacted laws governing the post-research placement for dogs and cats used in publicly funded research institutions. A national requirement is needed to ensure that research institutions that receive taxpayer funding establish adoption policies for companion animals that are no longer used for research, including finding such animals a home and implementing transparent policies concerning the success of such requirement.

Last month, Congressman Cárdenas introduced the Greyhound Protection Act, legislation to phase out live greyhound racing. That bill also bans the use of live animals for training of greyhounds, a practice that was discovered recently to still be used in some states.

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

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