Tag: Indonesia

Orangutan Named ‘Boncel’ Is Rescued & Translocated For A Second Time Due To Loss Of Habitat In Indonesia

An adult male orangutan, that was given the name Boncel, was recently rescued for a second time in West Kalimantan Province (Indonesian, Borneo).

The Wildlife Rescue Unit (WRU) of the Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA Kalbar) and International Animal Rescue (IAR) teamed up to help capture Boncel after he wandered into a village. He was then taken by the rescue team to a more remote part of the forest to ensure that he doesn’t return to the village.

The threat to the survival of orangutan species has increased due to the widespread fires that destroyed vast swathes of their rainforest habitat in the Ketapang area in 2019.

The devastation and deforestation of the land led to many orangutans being left without food and shelter. Orangutans were driven out of their natural habitat after the forest was destroyed and strayed into local villages in search of food, bringing them into contact with local people which resulted in conflict that risked harming both the orangutans and the villagers.

The Head of BKSDA Kalbar, Sadtata Noor Adirahmanta, expressed his appreciation for the quick response to this situation. “The repeated translocation of this orangutan shows that efforts to preserve wild endangered species require the cooperation of all parties. The community can support these efforts by themselves by working to repair wildlife habitats and prevent further damage to them.”

Boncel had been translocated from land belonging to residents in the village of Sungai Besar, to the surrounding forest, in mid-August of last year. The translocation was done in order to mitigate conflict with local villagers and take the orangutan back safely to the forest.

Although these translocations save the lives of individual orangutans, these actions are only a temporary solution.

This was proved in early November 2020, when IAR’s Orangutan Protection Unit (OPU) patrol team received information regarding Boncel entering Sungai Pelang Village.

The team immediately set off to verify the report and on November 11, 2020, they discovered one individual male orangutan eating the villagers’ pineapple plants. After observation and identification, they were able to confirm that this was in fact Boncel, who had previously been rescued from the village of Sungai Besar, and translocated by a team from the WRU of BKSDA Kalbar and IAR Indonesia on August 18th.

Consequently, the BKSDA’s WRU team and IAR Indonesia translocated Boncel for a second time. The operation, which took more than seven hours, went smoothly. IAR’s veterinarian examined Boncel’s condition and stated that the orangutan, who is estimated to be around 30-40 years old, is in good health and was fit to be translocated immediately.

You can help to save the last orangutans in Indonesia by looking on the back of products and packaged foods at the grocery store and commit to not purchasing anything containing Palm Oil or non-recycled paper products. #PalmsOffPalmOil 

The post Orangutan Named ‘Boncel’ Is Rescued & Translocated For A Second Time Due To Loss Of Habitat In Indonesia appeared first on World Animal News.

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Breaking! 30 Slow Lorises Reportedly Kept As ‘Pets’ Are Rescued & Released Back Into The Rainforest In Indonesia

A team of conservationists has reintroduced 30 Javan slow lorises back into their rainforest home in Indonesia. Mount Halimun Salak National Park (TNGHS) carried out the release operation, along with the Center for Natural Resources Conservation (BKSDA) and International Animal Rescue (IAR) Indonesia. 

As per Ammy Nurwati, the head of BKSDA, most of the lorises had been surrendered by members of the community to various sections of BKSDA in West Java, and had been entrusted to the IAR Indonesia Primate Center in Bogor to undergo treatment and care. Before being released back into the wild, the lorises had undergone a recovery and treatment process to stimulate their natural behavior. Starting with medical examinations and time in quarantine, they also underwent behavioral observations until they were declared healthy and ready to be translocated for habituation and then final release.

“During the habituation process, the team in the field continues to observe and record their progress every night. If, during the habituation period, all lorises are active and don’t have any abnormal behaviors, then they can be released into the wild,” Ammy shared in a statement sent to WAN. “They have to go through this long process to restore their natural instincts and ensure that they can survive and reproduce in their natural habitat.”

Ammy further explained that the slow loris release program was created to support the sustainability of ecological processes in the conservation area, as well as to maintain and increase the population of primate species whose numbers are decreasing.

Ahmad Munawir, Head of the TNGHS Office, said that the release of rehabilitated animals and conflict animals in Mount Halimun Salak National Park has become one of the most important programs in terms of saving wildlife. The slow loris is one of the wild animals that is vital to maintaining the balance of the ecosystem in the National Park. The release area has an ecosystem considered suitable as a place for the preservation and protection of slow lorises in terms of area security, availability of food and shade, habitat carrying capacity, and the level of predator threats. The hope is that with this release, the slow lorises can reproduce and thrive.

In order to minimize all risk of disease transmission, the safety procedures at IAR’s primate center in Bogor have been strengthened even further due to the COVID-19 pandemic situation.

“The health and safety protocols in this release activity were improved to minimize the risk of disease transmission. From the animal-side, a swab-test was carried out in the laboratory facility of the Center for Study of Primates – IPB University, and the results were all negative. From the human side, the implementation of all protocols was carried out correctly,” stated Alan Knight OBE, IAR Chief Executive. “All adjustments in this release procedure are part of efforts to eliminate the potential for transmission of COVID-19 and other zoonotic infectious diseases, so that our release and other conservation activities can continue, even in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

The post Breaking! 30 Slow Lorises Reportedly Kept As ‘Pets’ Are Rescued & Released Back Into The Rainforest In Indonesia appeared first on World Animal News.

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Breaking! Endangered Javan Rhino Population Continues To Grow With Recent Birth Of Two More Calves In The Ujung Kulon National Park In Indonesia

Photo By: Indonesia’s Ministry of Environment and Forestry 

The Ministry of Environment and Forestry (KLHK) in Indonesia announced the birth of two Javan rhinos in the Ujung Kulon National Park; a male named Luther and a female named Helen. The calves were detected by monitoring results of the Ujung Kulon National Park team from March to August 2020 using 93 video camera traps.

As of August, this year, the cumulative number of Javan Rhino according to the latest data from the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, has reached 74 individuals, consisting of 40 males and 34 females. Fifteen of the rhinos are children while 59 are of juvenile-adult age.

According to Wiratno, the Director General of Conservation of Natural Resources and Ecosystems at the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, five other Javan Rhinos were born at the Javan Rhino habitat in Ujung Kulon National Park since last year.

“The birth of the Javan Rhino in Ujung Kulon National Park confirms that the Javan Rhino population continues to experience natural breeding, so that it continues to provide great hope for the survival of endangered Javan Rhinos,” Wiratno said in a statement.

Wiratno then emphasized that, even in the COVID-19 pandemic situation, field monitoring was continuing, including through video camera traps. Monitoring and full protection activities will continue until the end of December 2020.

“From one birth to the next, the Javan Rhino continues to connect, and this strengthens our optimism and enthusiasm, especially in the very difficult situation during the current pandemic,” concluded Wiratno.

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

The post Breaking! Endangered Javan Rhino Population Continues To Grow With Recent Birth Of Two More Calves In The Ujung Kulon National Park In Indonesia appeared first on World Animal News.

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