Tag: Center

Tiny Saw-Whet Owl Found In Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree After Traveling 170 Miles To New York City

A tiny saw-whet owl is now recovering at the Ravensbeard Wildlife Center in New York after the bird was found in the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree once the tree arrived to its final destination.

It all started when a 75-foot Norway spruce tree was cut down on Thursday in Oneonta, New York and made its journey to New York City. It was then when a worker for the company that helped transport the tree, noticed the small owl.

According to a Ravensbeard Wildlife Center’s Facebook post, the worker’s wife had contacted them asking if they took in owls for rehabilitation, thankfully they did.

After the tiny owl, which has been named Rockefeller, was turned over to the wildlife center, they immediately performed a health check. Despite his 170-mile journey, he appeared to be in good condition.

“We’ve given him fluids and are feeding him all the mice he will eat. It had been three days since he ate or drank anything. So far so good, his eyes are bright and he seems relatively in good condition with all he’s been through,” said Ravensbeard Wildlife Center in a Facebook post. “Once he checks in with the vet and gets a clean bill of health, he’ll be released to continue on his wild and wonderful journey.”

Ravensbeard Wildlife Center has been a refuge for injured and orphaned wildlife for over 20 years. However, five years ago, the center was forced to relocate and since then, they have been set up as a temporary rehab shelter. This year, they took in over 150 birds – way beyond their capacity.

The Center has recently partnered with Hootsuite to help tell the story of Rockefeller the owl, using #socialforgood to ensure his safe return to his natural habitat, and to support the work this organization does at their rescue center.

Please donate today to help them not only care for Rockefeller, but for all of the rescued animals that they continue to rescue, rehabilitate, and release HERE!

Although the owl did not sustain any injuries from the transportation, it is important for us to point out that this selected tree was most likely home to many wild animals. We hope Rockefeller Center can one day move towards a more ecological solution, instead of cutting down these beautiful trees for their Christmas display.

The post Tiny Saw-Whet Owl Found In Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree After Traveling 170 Miles To New York City appeared first on World Animal News.

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WAN Exclusive: Your Help Is Needed As 19 Orphaned & Injured Black Bear Cubs Have Been Rescued & Are Being Cared For By The Wildlife Center Of Virginia

The Wildlife Center of Virginia, which is experiencing a record year for black bear rescues, is currently caring for 19 cubs from across the state who have been orphaned, injured, or separated from their mothers. The young cubs were born in January and February of this year.

Upon learning that the Center recently issued a plea for food to help feed the black bear cubs, WAN and our charity Peace 4 Animals wanted to know how we could help.

WAN connected with Lauren Edzenga, a knowledgeable Outreach Educator for The Wildlife Center of Virginia, which holds the only rehabilitation permit for black bears in the state. Hence, the facility is well-equipped to take care of this adorably unique species.

“It is fall, and it’s the time of year when bears in the wild begin to eat excessively as they bulk up for the ‘lean times’ of winter,” Edzenga told WAN. “It is called hyperphagia, and the 19 cubs are now eating us out of house and home.”

According to Edzenga, the Center’s bear-care team has increased bear feeding from 152 pounds to 190 pounds of food per day. That is 10 pounds of food per cub, seven days a week.

Fortunately, many locals have been delivering requested menu items for the cubs, including a variety of nuts.

“While these cubs are not related siblings, they are being raised together in an effort to provide them with the social interaction they require, as well as to reduce the risk of them becoming habituated or used to humans,” explained Edzenga.

To limit human interaction, Edzenga shared that only a few members of the staff care for the orphaned bear cubs. Depending on their age and condition when they arrive, cubs may live in a Zinger crate, in the Center’s Large Mammal Isolation enclosure, or in the Center’s Black Bear Complex.

The Center has some set weight guidelines that help determine when cubs are ready to move to their next stage of housing; the cubs usually move to the Large Mammal enclosure when they are more than 3.0 kg, which is typically in May. Once they weigh more than 10 kg, typically in July, they are large enough to move to the Black Bear Complex. The cubs also must be weaned from their formula before they are moved to the Black Bear Complex, which is a half-acre forest to explore.

“Wild animals require very intensive, specialized care, so it’s important that wildlife in need is given to permitted wildlife rehabilitators so they have the best chance of survival,” stated Edzenga.

The young bears will be cared for by the Wildlife Center until next spring, at the time when they would naturally begin dispersing from their mothers. The 2020 cubs will be released back into the wild in the spring of 2021. 

The Wildlife Center of Virginia is a non-profit formed in 1982 to provide quality health care, often on an emergency basis, to native wildlife. The Center admits more than 3,000 patients annually, accounting for over 200 different species.

For ways to help these adorable orphaned cubs, please donate to The Wildlife Center of Virginia HERE! 

You can help all animals and our planet by choosing compassion on your plate and in your glass. #GoVeg

The post WAN Exclusive: Your Help Is Needed As 19 Orphaned & Injured Black Bear Cubs Have Been Rescued & Are Being Cared For By The Wildlife Center Of Virginia appeared first on World Animal News.

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Captive Beluga Whales Named Little White & Little Grey Have Been Rescued From A Russian Research Center & Released To An Open Water Sanctuary In Iceland

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Singapore Crushes 9 Tons Of Elephant Ivory & Launches New Center For Wildlife Forensics To Further Combat Illegal Wildlife Trade

Today, the National Parks Board, Singapore (NParks) crushed nine tons of ivory, worth S$18 million, to commemorate World Elephant Day, which falls on August 12th. Singapore’s ivory crushing event, the largest globally in recent years, demonstrates Singapore’s strong determination and commitment to combat the illegal trade in wildlife.

The destruction of the ivory seized from various shipments in past years will prevent it from re-entering the market and will disrupt the global supply chain of illegally traded ivory.

Singapore’s first Center for Wildlife Forensics (CWF) also launched today. The CWF will strengthen NParks’ detection and diagnostic capabilities by drawing upon expertise across NParks to identify and analyse specimens involved in the illegal wildlife trade. This will strengthen Singapore’s role in the international fight against the illegal trade in wildlife.

The CWF will focus on wildlife most severely impacted by the illegal wildlife trade, including: elephants, rhinoceros, pangolins, sharks, and rays.

Collaborations between NParks, Singapore Customs, the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority, as well as other international counterparts have enabled Singapore to seize record amounts of pangolin scales and elephant ivory that were en route to other countries in the region.

“The CITES secretariat has witnessed the high level of priority the government in Singapore affords to curtailing wildlife crime, and the sustained and coordinated involvement of multiple agencies in doing so. Singapore’s use of rigorous risk management and indicators has proven to be highly effective in the screening of suspicious cargo and passengers,” CITES Secretary General, Ms. Ivonne Higuero, said in a statement. The significant seizures made by authorities in Singapore underscore the efficiency of this approach, and the intelligence reports generated in this regard have also supported actions by other parties.”

Currently, Singapore identifies seized items through morphological and molecular analysis. Moving forward, the Center for Wildlife Forensics can utilize DNA analysis methods that will focus on next generation sequencing, utilizing chemical methods, such as mass spectrometry and isotope analysis, to provide greater resolution and deeper insights on the seized items. Their main focus will closely examine the origin of the population and species that have been poached. This information can help international organizations and source countries to undertake further investigations and enforcements against poachers and smugglers. These capabilities will aid the analysis of seizures throughout the globe to identify potential linkages and syndicates through collaborations with international experts and organizations.

“The launch of a Center for Wildlife Forensics in Singapore represents a major step towards strengthening the country’s knowledge and capabilities. The Center will establish a dedicated capacity building entity for enforcement officers, providing training for the complex task of detecting illegal wildlife and wildlife products,” continued Higuero. “This is exactly the kind of response that is needed to tackle illegal wildlife crime. Forensic applications must fully be used to combat illegal trade in wildlife.”

The Center for Wildlife Forensics will also strengthen Singapore’s commitment to conserve biodiversity in the country’s nature reserves and parks.

The post Singapore Crushes 9 Tons Of Elephant Ivory & Launches New Center For Wildlife Forensics To Further Combat Illegal Wildlife Trade appeared first on World Animal News.

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